Archive for the ‘Disciplines’ Category

Nocera on BBC Horizons

Monday, June 24th, 2013

Nice…

 

Of course, it’d be even nicer with safety glasses.

Also, beautiful new labs. Yum.

BRSM is Coming to America

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

There’s a chemblog carnival afoot to wish BRSM well on his upcoming postdoc in the U.S. @JessTheChemist is curating the posts on her blog, here. You can check out more info on Twitter with the hashtag #BRSMBlogParty.

BRSM is a synthetic organic chemist with a great blog dedicated to the subject. I know little else about BRSM beyond that he/she is currently based in the UK. (Obviously, I’m not even 100% sure about his/her gender.) That makes answering some of the carnival questions harder, but I’ll give it a shot anyway:

1. What is your message for BRSM?

Best wishes for your upcoming postdoc in the US, wherever it may be and in whatever area of research.

2. What is one postdoc survival tip you would give to BRSM?

Try to be nice to—or at least respectful of—your colleagues. Be especially nice to people like janitors, security guards, secretaries, instrument staff, and administrators. There will be times where you’ll need their help getting out of a bind, and having any of these people as enemies can make your life hell.

3. Do you have a fun story you could share from your postdoc and/or US academic experience?

Well, there was the kitty job interview. There was also the time we (unknowingly) named our high-school science outreach program after a sexual act. Oops.

4. A survival tip for living in the US?

Relative to what you have in the UK, our public transportation is poor. If you are going to live in or near New York City, Boston, or San Francisco, you probably do not want a car—parking stinks. If you are going to live somewhere else, you probably do want a car.

5. What would you like to see on BRSM blog in the future?

Tasteful nude photos.

No, seriously, whatever you want. I would rather you keep blogging about what interests you than burn out blogging about what interests other people. And thanks for posting the Felkin-Ahn slides; I think they make a nice companion to Dave Evans’ Chem 206 notes.

6. Anything else?

Nope. Safe travels!

Quiz: Named Chemical Reagents and Catalysts

Sunday, May 26th, 2013

I made this little ditty on Sporcle. Given a systematic name of a molecule, provide the last name of the chemist for whom the reagent or catalyst is named…

ACS President-Elect Tom Barton Seeks Input on Fracking

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

Tom Barton won last year’s ACS national election for President (and was kind enough to answer our questionnaire about important issues facing the society). Yesterday, President-Elect Barton asked that I share this message with the readers of the blog:

In my ACS presidential year of 2014 I’m considering hosting a symposium on fracking with, of course, emphasis on the involvement of chemicals.  I would appreciate hearing from anyone suggestions for particular areas for inclusion, and potential speakers.  I seek a balanced set of presentations from experts in the various aspects, and would certainly be interested in any germane research.  I myself am not an expert in this arena, but I am trying to get smart in it.  In advance, I appreciate your assistance.

Feel free to weigh in using the comments. I will leave the first…

Chemical Nostalgia: My First Conference

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

The Capitals beat the Maple Leafs yesterday, which for some strange reason made me think about what a great time I had at my first scientific conference, in Toronto. It was a meeting of The Electrochemical Society, and my labmates and I gave talks in a session devoted to electron transfer in functionalized fullerenes.

Things seemed so pure to me back then, well before layers of skepticism and cynicism caked onto my core love of chemistry. I had just finished my sophomore year at NYU, and I was scared as hell about giving my first talk. You can see my slides here, but this all took place in the era before slide presentations on LCD projectors were standard. I had to print the file onto transparencies at Kinko’s and carry them along on the trip.

I can vividly remember giving my first practice talk in front of the guys in lab. I thought my pace was fine, but I had rushed through what was supposed to be a 20-minute presentation in less than 10 minutes. This compounded my fears, so in addition to two more practice runs at NYU, we all went into a speakers’ ready-room at the hotel in Toronto and practiced again on site. Our typical conversations that day focused on how many spare pairs of underpants we thought we’d need to bring along to our talks.

At the session, I can remember my friends and I smacking each other to point out famous chemists. Fame is a relative term, but these people were all famous to us because we’d read so many papers about porphyrins and fullerenes. They were the titans of our world. “Oh my God…that’s Jean-Francois Nierengarten!” Dirk Guldi, another prolific author in our field, presented in a three-piece suit. Fred Wudl was there, and I believe Luis Echegoyen, too. It was like sitting in the front row of a rock concert. “Hey man! I read your papers!”

I can remember nothing of my presentation besides having to peel each transparency out of my purple three-ring binder before laying the sheet down on the blindingly bright projector. I made it through in great time, and mercifully, the questions focused more on the synthesis than the photophysics. I was much more comfortable with the former. I chuckled when I went back through the presentation and saw this slide:

messy_porphyrin_column_slide

Those columns were my life. You’d run reactions that would turn dark, then you’d add a bunch of DDQ and they’d turn even darker—jet black. At this point, you’d have to fish out your miserable (sub-10%) yield of porphyrin from amongst grams and grams of crap. I’m sure none of the PIs cared about how much these columns sucked, but Little Me cared deeply enough to use my nifty digital camera to snap a pic and make a slide out of it.

Also in hindsight, I can’t believe I omitted the hydrogens on my aldehyde functional groups. I hate it when people draw naked carbonyls:

naked_aldehyde_no_hydrogen_shown

The conference was much easier to enjoy once our presentations were done. I can remember several of the other talks and getting excited about some of the supramolecular chemistry being done. My friends and I also got to see a bit of the city, including the CN Tower and a Blue Jays’ game where Pedro Martinez was the starter. We sat on the first-base line, and the movement on his pitches was unbelievable.

Perhaps inspired by the night out—and since we were able to finally place faces/bodies with the names we’d seen in papers—my labmates and I decided to have a bit of fun. We drew a baseball diamond on a piece of paper and slotted the professors into positions and a batting order based on how athletic we thought they were. We then anonymously posted the sheet on the bulletin board outside the presentation room. I can remember the bosses crowding around it and complaining about their assignments.

And, perhaps this was the first time that I saw how these “adults” were not much different from the rest of us. I’ve never been as excited about a conference as that one, and I don’t think I ever will be.

WWWTP? – Markovnikov Edition

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

Perfectionists take note: even titans of catalysis make embarrassing mistakes with their chemistry. Just look at this little oopsie that was caught by an astute reader in the Midwest.

It seems like there might be a bit of confusion hanging over the chemists developing methods for anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of alkenes at the Center for Enabling New Technologies Through Catalysis (CENTC):

centc_markovnikov_error

Ummm….yeah….that’s not the difference between Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov addition.

Those of you who’ve taken sophomore organic chemistry will remember that Markovnikov’s rule states that protic functional groups (e.g., H-NR’R') will typically add to double bonds such that the hydrogen adds to the less substituted carbon (and the other group, e.g., -NR’R', adds to the more substituted carbon.) What Hartwig and coworkers have drawn as the Markovnikov product is still anti-Markovnikov. The products they’ve drawn might charitably be called conformational isomers, but they’ve failed to note any 3-D structure.

Of course, the true Markovnikov product would place the amine on the same carbon as the R group.